Episode 26 - The Difference is In the Details

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Jeff Becker is the Co-founder of powerhouse hoops in Phoenix Arizona which is a nationally recognized basketball academy. Jeff strives to teach his players skills and life lessons that apply on and off of the court, a concept that many yoga and other studio fitness business do as well. Jeff is with us today to discuss the importance of developing the character of his students and how that has helped him to grow his business.

Jeff is also a newly published author, be sure to check out his book co-author, with his father, Tender Lions: Building the Vital Relationship Between Father and Son.


Instagram: @Powerhousehoops

Website: https://powerhousehoops.com/

Best way to reach him: jbecker@powerhousehoops.com

Host - Dan:
fitDEGREE is more than just two guys with microphones. It is the studio management software you've been looking for. For more info reach out to me on our website at www.fitDEGREE.com, on Instagram at the handle fitDEGREE, or my email dan.berger that's B-E-R-G-E-R at fitDEGREE.com to get the conversation started. All right now on to the show.

Host - Dan:
Hey everyone and welcome back to another episode of the fitDEGREE podcast. I'm Dan, your host, and I'm joined today, as always, by my co-host, Nick Dennis. Today's guest breaks out of our usual profile just a little bit and I think you'll love the change of pace.

Host - Dan:
Jeff Becker is the co-founder of Powerhouse Hoops in Phoenix, Arizona. Which is a nationally recognized basketball academy. Jeff strives to teach his players skills and life lessons that apply on and off the court. A concept that many yoga and other studio fitness businesses do as well. Jeff is with us today to discuss the importance of developing the character of his students and how that has helped him to grow his business. Welcome to the show, Jeff. Glad you could join us today.

Jeff Becker:
Thank you guys so much. The pleasure's all mine.

Host - Dan:
Awesome, man. Glad you could be here. So, to start this tell us a little bit about the story of Powerhouse Hoops? What inspired this? How'd you get it off the ground? Your story, tell me how it goes?

Jeff Becker:
So, my story kind of begins where I always tell my guys, you can't have a testimony without a test. I just got done coaching college basketball, Division I at Northern Illinois, spent a year at the high school level and I was just kind of saying, "Mom, I need a little sabbatical."

Jeff Becker:
A friend of mine called who worked with me at the college level and said, "Hey, we're going to start club basketball out here in Phoenix." My initial answer was, "No. I hate club basketball. I hate what it's about. No one does it the right way and no one does it for the right reasons." That has always been the stigma and still is kind of the stigma about club basketball that it's kind of a money grab and my buddy said, "Well, hey we're former college basketball players, we're former Division I coaches, let's do it our way. Let's hold people accountable. Let's hold parents accountable. Let's hold players accountable. And let's try to grow a better person to the sport and really impact them with our energy and our passion for utilizing basketball as a tool for life."

Jeff Becker:
So, I was like, "You know what? I'm 24 years old." He goes, "You can come sleep on my couch. I live in Scottsdale." He says, "I can give you 500 bucks a month." And I said, "All right, cool." So I packed up my car. Told my mom I'd be back in four months. Ended up sleeping on my buddies couch for probably seven or eight months. And just kind of fell in love with the process, the vision, the mission of truly trying to impact a kid's life.

Jeff Becker:
And we all know that at 15, 16, 17 years old, it's very hard for those teenagers to listen to their parents but I can say the exact same thing. And they look up to me. And it's a mentorship and it's cool that I can have, you know, 50 kids or I can say something to 50 kids but they're holding me extremely accountable as well.

Jeff Becker:
So here we are now six years later and we have roughly 60 teams around the country. We've helped send about 100 kids to go play on to the collegiate level. We have a few guys play professional ball and we built the 31,000 square foot facility here in central Phoenix. So, it's truly a blessing. But it's also just, it's a ministry. It's a passion of mine that you can hopefully just kind of build off this and kind of see where it goes for the future.

Host - Dan:
So, you really wasted no time getting started on this path in life. I mean, that's a pretty young age to go from Division I coaching to I'm going to start prepping kids for Division I and elite level coaching of your own business. Not through a separate organization.

Jeff Becker:
You know it honestly, I've never taken a business class a day in my life. So, year one we only had five teams and I thought it was just going to be a fun thing to get me away from Chicago for the summer. But I fell in love with the ministry of wanting to give back and really trying to impact these kids on a deeper level than just dribbling an orange basketball.

Jeff Becker:
And year two we had 25 teams. And I was kind of like well, I've never taken a business class before but this seems like we're going down the right path.

Support - Nick:
Yeah, 5x in one year.

Jeff Becker:
But I've never looked at it as a business. I've never looked at it as a job. I truly look it as how do we humble? How do we give back? How do we mentor? And how do we emulate what we want to be done for our future society and really help grow a better person through the sport? And try to teach that relationships matter and that accountability and vulnerability and mental toughness and fighting through adversity, things that will hopefully impact these kids 5-20 years down the road. So, it's been a blessing.

Support - Nick:
I think one thing you're hitting on hard right now is that you had your why so you didn't have to have a business mindset. You had your why to drive you and your why in itself created a business out of it just by it being a scalable process of mentoring kids.

Support - Nick:
A lot of people, we've had a few people on the podcast say, "What's your biggest takeaway?" And they said, "Know your why. You got to find your why."

Support - Nick:
People get into business to get in business and maybe it's for one reason or another and they're a year or two into their business, they have to discover their why, and then drive their marketing message around their why. You had your why from the get-go. You knew what you wanted to get out of this and I think that you hit the nail on the head. I haven't been in the, what's it called? It's not the AAU. What did you refer to it as?

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, it's club basketball.

Support - Nick:
Club basketball, right? I've been around club hockey my whole life. I totally get what you're saying. There is such a stigma. It's not about getting to the next level. It's not about becoming a better person. It's about getting scouts to showcase games and try to get a scholarship but they don't really care what happens after that scholarship. You're not really setting yourself up for life.

Support - Nick:
So, I would say your why right there drove you. I mean you slept on a couch for eight months, you must have loved what you were doing. And it looks you're a tall guy, so that must have not been comfortable.

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, no. Well, my phrase for my guys is find your crazy.

Support - Nick:
That works too.

Jeff Becker:
You know, and that's a thing is it was my, that's kind of my testament to my guys is you know, I went through some stuff with my dad and had some, you know he had some addiction stuff. But basketball was my crazy.

Jeff Becker:
What is it that gets you out of your deepest hours and you have to believe in something greater than yourself to get you through life. So for my phrase when I talk to parents, players, conferences, whatever, is what is your crazy? It doesn't have to be basketball. It doesn't have to be working out. It could be art and reading or whatever. And you do have to have something to hold on to. I truly believe that can impact you and get you out of your deepest and darkest days.

Support - Nick:
I 100% agree. So, now, not to get into the business side but talk about how you went from 5 teams to 25 teams, now you have 60 teams. What does that mean? You're a club team, you have your facility in Arizona but you have 60 teams around the country. What does that mean?

Host - Dan:
And also, what does it mean when you say you have a team? Just for anyone listening.

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, so these are all players... That's a great question. These are all players that come to our tryouts. These are all out-of-school events and teams. They're not playing for their high school. We're not playing for a middle school team. These are guys that are literally coming from all over the Phoenix area. And some are from all, travel two or three hours just to come to practice for us. But how this kind of grew was obviously I think that parents invest in me. They invest in your business, they invest in your mission, they invest in your energy and your passion. Whether that's basketball, owning your own gym, whatever that is they read you first and foremost over the brand or name on your chest.

Jeff Becker:
And so, year one we probably had eight Division I players that when we helped get to the next level that went to Oregon and Arizona State and New Mexico and Central Arkansas. So we had a great springboard to really open the eyes of how we're trying to help change the culture of Arizona basketball. Not only were they great basketball players but they're even better young men. We have a few guys that are now in the NBA or the minor leagues of the NBA, the G League, that are now wanting to give back and now they recognize what we do for the kids and it's hopefully now going to come full circle where we're helping young men become great mentors for others.

Support - Nick:
That's what I was going ask next is, you're creating this impact, right? It's not about what typical club basketball is about. Your focus is on growing these boys into men essentially. What is the, not turnover... feels like the wrong word but what is the turnover rate of now those kids coming back after they've ran their basketball career to, you know, what they consider the end now they come back.

Host - Dan:
Whatever its course is.

Support - Nick:
Yeah. They run its course. They know they're not going to the pros. They want to come back and help and help other kids have the same experience.

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, so it's been pretty cool. Like I said, this is season 7, year 6 for me. So we have one full class that has now had a full year out of college.

Jeff Becker:
Like I said, a few are trying the professional route, a few just kind of stopped playing.

Jeff Becker:
It is very fun to now have a few guys that are now back on my coaching roster and now they're coaching my 12-year-old teams and my and 13-year-old teams and it's a really cool mentorship to watch these guys grow up, become great young men, and have those scary, that I'm an old man now, but scary times looking back and remembering them in the jerseys and training them and checking in on their rooms.

Host - Dan:
Back when they were only 6'2" and not 7'3".

Jeff Becker:
Man, exactly. And the room checks back in LA and making sure they're not sneaking things or kids or girls into their rooms, what teenagers do.

Jeff Becker:
It's humbling, it really is and it's a blessing too. To try to not just impact, like I keep saying, not just trying to impact a better player but impact the whole community all together.

Host - Dan:
At this point, it almost sounds like you're going to have as large of a roster of potential coaches as you will players.

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, absolutely. And it's a blessing and a curse. It's great that we have been blessed with guys who see the vision, see the mission, see the values, and want to entrench theirselves and some are volunteers.

Jeff Becker:
It's great because I know we're giving the best possible product and knowledge-base to our kids.

Jeff Becker:
But it's also it's tough because just like any job is, you're looking at resumes, you're calling up references, and you're trying to make sure because there's a very fine line when you're dealing with people's kids and you're dealing with people's money.

Jeff Becker:
So you have to be very smart and you have to really do your background to make sure that our guys are knowledgeable and service-side and all that stuff.

Host - Dan:
I mean hey, these guys are no strangers to competition, surely. I'd have to imagine they'd understand that you're picking the best people for your business and also, to carry out your mission, your mission statement, and what you stand for as well, right?

Jeff Becker:
Absolutely. And it's just like any business where your relationships is guys year one, they're not familiar with my expectations or how we do things but we've had guys that have been with us since day one and four, five, years now.

Jeff Becker:
The roots get deeper. They get more entrenched with the values and the belief system and my expectations so it just gets deeper and deeper and stronger and stronger I would say.

Host - Dan:
That's phenomenal and that's important because they help to create that community.

Host - Dan:
That leads also right into the next thing I wanted to ask. One thing we talked about in our business for a while was the buy-in. When you're talking to people and when people, when a studio they want to switch their software, they want to offer new classes, whatever it is, they change something. You got to get buy-in from everyone in your community. What's the buy-in like? When you guys try something new or when you institute a policy or say, "Hey, this is how things are." Do you generally have 95 plus percent buy-in within your community because people trust how you run your process?

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, it's interesting because I think, like I said, we've been blessed to be able to send guys to major colleges so we have a pedigree and the resume to prove guys are at Kansas and Vanderbilt and Arizona State and all over.

Jeff Becker:
So that helps initially. And the phrase I've heard and I tell my coaches a lot is, parents can pick up on your energy and your emotions but kids can read it twice as fast. They truly know if you're caring about the experience, the situation, and a kid's life.

Jeff Becker:
From a buy-in standpoint obviously, our resume helps a lot but I can't be everywhere at once with all 40 teams so we need 40 coaches that are truly passionate about not just wins and losses but how are you developing that kid and that team, whether he's a starter and the best player on the team, or the ninth kid that's sitting on the bench who might not get as much minutes.

Host - Dan:
Sure. How do the parents usually react to that?

Jeff Becker:
That is quite a loaded question.

Support - Nick:
Not as rational.

Jeff Becker:
My phrase is every player will be coached but not every player will be coached the same. Everyone will play, not everyone will get the same minutes.

Jeff Becker:
You have to be honest and I think that's also a huge reason is that we're not going to over promise, under deliver. We're going to under promise, over deliver.

Jeff Becker:
We have to be honest with the player, we have to be honest with the parents. I can't tell you how many times a year we sit down with the family and they say, "Well, I want to go to UCLA, Duke, or Kentucky."

Jeff Becker:
It's as simple as saying, "Okay, well write down realistically your top 5 schools." And then we read them over and then I send it back and I say, "Okay, realistically write down your top 5 schools."

Support - Nick:
That's what I was going to say. Do you have a second process after that?

Jeff Becker:
Right but we have such good guys with such close connections with college coaches and at the college level that we have to be realistic and honest with where they are.

Jeff Becker:
Whether that's a middle school kid trying to just make his 7th or 8th grade team. Whether that's an 8th grader trying to make his high school team. Or a high school trip player trying to make the varsity team. Or a varsity player trying to make a college program, we're trying to prepare you for that next level.

Jeff Becker:
Whatever that next level is for you. That's why our staff is so great where we have high school coaches and varsity head coaches and former college coaches on staff so we can realistically tell the parents and players, "Hey-

Host - Dan:
This is your path.

Jeff Becker:
These guys they've done their and I understand that you might be used to this way or that way but we're going to prepare you for that path like we talked about.

Support - Nick:
Well, one thing you just said is this also hurts your brand because you can't just pull a string and say, "I am friends with the guys at Duke or Kentucky or UCLA. I can get you a tryout." And then you give them someone sub-par. That hurts your brand. So it is kind of a two-way street of you have to be realistic with them because you can't have that affecting your future business for when you do have the guys that can play at that level.

Support - Nick:
You're first and foremost, you're trying to develop people. Playing at a Duke, Kentucky level is those are a lot of one and done kind of kids, they don't come around very often.

Jeff Becker:
Absolutely and that's it. Not only do we have a reputation to hold and hold ourselves to the highest standards with our players and our parents but also at the other end we have college coaches that truly believe our word and what we're saying.

Jeff Becker:
If we're saying, "Hey, we've got a guy that could truly be a great kid but also could help your program," they entrust in us and if we send them someone that's not going to do that, we're going to burn that bridge just as easily if we burn a parent's bridge.

Jeff Becker:
So we're honest all the way through.

Support - Nick:
I think that's really key to your business model and the double relationship you have going here.

Host - Dan:
Is it difficult in basketball, you've got 5 players on the field at a time. Pardon my ignorance, what's it 10 on the starting roster?

Support - Nick:
12 maybe

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, 12.

Host - Dan:
12 on a starting roster?

Jeff Becker:
Five on five. Yes sir.

Host - Dan:
Now every kid growing up at some point has played basketball and I imagine lots of kids want to play, does that small of a roster size really make it difficult when kids have to be the top of the top in looking at going to these elite programs?

Jeff Becker:
It's such a crazy world because we're literally in two weeks we're going to head off to Kansas City with some of our top teams and we're going to play in front of 50 to 100 college coaches a game.

Host - Dan:
Wow.

Jeff Becker:
It's stressful. It's really crazy to think that grown men are watching teenagers play basketball but their jobs depend on it.

Jeff Becker:
From my mindset and from a college coach's mindset, especially at that highest level it's hey, if you can't perform in front of this environment now.

Host - Dan:
It's only going to get worse.

Jeff Becker:
How are you going to be able to perform in front of thousands? And that's when my wife and my family's life is on the line because you better perform and you better win.

Jeff Becker:
It's tough but it's also, you have to have a good balance of being able to balance the mental, the physical, and the spiritual side of basketball and a player to make sure they can handle that pressure.

Host - Dan:
And that's when you send them over to Gretchen's room for the mind, body, and spirit part.

Jeff Becker:
Honestly, with the facility here, that's why we have it. We have the yoga studio, we have a cryotherapy room, we have a weight room because to be at the elite level, at the highest level, there's much more than just dribbling an orange ball.

Jeff Becker:
We do want to try to again, change that culture and educate not just the players but educate the parents as well that you do have to work on the physical, mental, spiritual side with yoga, rehab, prehab, with cryotherapy, and the strength and agility training in the weight room.

Host - Dan:
Yeah prehab, that's a term I hear Nick use a lot. It's one of his favorite things to do.

Support - Nick:
I've been big on it the past eight months. It's helped me make more progress in the gym than anything I did before.

Host - Dan:
I could probably adopt that. I'm made of paper and glass. And rugby's a bad sport to be made of paper and glass.

Jeff Becker:
I believe it, I believe it.

Jeff Becker:
I'm 6'6", about 200 pounds so you won't catch me on the rugby field anytime soon.

Support - Nick:
Now bringing back to more of our typical listeners, the yogis and the cryo core people, how many clubs, you're competing against other organizations that have clubs, how many of them bring in the spiritual mental side.

Support - Nick:
How much has the grateful yogini, one of our former guests on the show-

Host - Dan:
That's Gretchen by the way.

Support - Nick:
Helped your approach?

Jeff Becker:
Well to answer the first question, how many of them do it? I would say, maybe 1% around the country. I don't know if they don't see the value or it's that they're trying to cut costs, they're trying to make the pricing structure the least possible so they can be accommodating to all families and all demographics.

Jeff Becker:
It's so important to us to add the extra value that if players and families want to play and get their kid to the next level, I can't think of any college program that doesn't have a yoga session at least once a week.

Support - Nick:
This is getting more popular at least in the college scene.

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, absolutely.

Host - Dan:
That's awesome. College is looking for anything to get their competitive edge. I coach collegiate with rugby and our head coach is so forward-thinking in what he'd like to do and unfortunately even Division I rugby is still considered a club sport. There's maybe one or two varsity teams in the country, they're still club.

Host - Dan:
The budget restricts. They won't even give us weight room time at our school. And our coach is like I want to get these kids doing yoga. I want to have them talk to someone who can teach them how to do nutrition on a college budget and this and that. And it's like great do we have enough money for buses next week?

Jeff Becker:
Yeah, absolutely. And that's what it comes down to is really the budget.

Jeff Becker:
There is the word that are we a little more expensive than others? Yeah, absolutely. But I can guarantee that we're going to have the best product. And I guarantee that we're really going to physically, mentally, spiritually prepare that child for the next level.

Jeff Becker:
It's the short-term vision versus long-term goal.

Support - Nick:
I think it's got to be a combination of one, the people in your position don't see the value or two, if they do, they're not good enough at demonstrating the value to their customers.

Jeff Becker:
Yes, absolutely and then that goes back to day one, year one where parents and players entrust in you. They entrust in your vision, they entrust in your word moreso than whatever name or brand is on your jersey.

Jeff Becker:
There's a lot of accountability and a lot of eyes looking up to me and I love it. It makes me walk on the straight path and be a better person and really, truly hold myself accountable because I know I have to walk the walk and talk the talk.

Support - Nick:
It makes a whole heck of a lot of sense. I think that's the most important thing is when people stop practicing what they're preaching, they lose sight.

Support - Nick:
Because I feel like in fitness, talking about the prehab, I used to tell people that more than I would do it. Then I pulled my groin, now I'm the one doing it.

Support - Nick:
Now I'm preaching it more passionately as ever and now I'm also learning all these new insights and I'm saying, "Look, I'm saying this today, I might say something different next month, next year because I'm in it."

Support - Nick:
I'm in it and I know what's going on and I understand it.

Support - Nick:
I think pulling yourself out and getting too business-minded and not living in the trenches will hurt your business in the long run as well.

Jeff Becker:
Absolutely, I still enjoy getting on the court, getting in the weight room. I'm one of those guys that's up at 5:30, 6:00 AM. I do my meditation, I do my reading, I do my crossfit, I go to yoga. I'm in the trenches with them and I'm big on talking to my guys about being a foxhole guy.

Jeff Becker:
Whether that's my coaches or my players, you have to be ready at a minute's notice and you've got to be the guy that if you get called you're ready to go. Be a foxhole guy for others.

Support - Nick:
Right. So now, this is you say year six of the business, right?

Jeff Becker:
Yes, sir.

Support - Nick:
What's your favorite thing that you do today? When you started you were probably doing a little bit of everything.

Jeff Becker:
Yes, sir.

Support - Nick:
Now, I'm assuming that you've been able to delegate some of the work. What's your favorite thing you do at work right now?

Jeff Becker:
Character development or personal development. Literally yesterday I was meeting with how do we implement financial literacy and interview skills into our program?

Jeff Becker:
A good friend of mine is one of the larger sports anchors here in Arizona in Phoenix and so I have guys that literally are some of the top players in the country but they don't know how to balance a checkbook, they don't know what a debit card is.

Jeff Becker:
Literally, one kid, we were going on a recruiting trip. We took an Uber to the airport, I get out of the Uber and he's still sitting in there and I go, "We got to get out, we have to catch our flight."

Jeff Becker:
And he goes, "Well you didn't pay the taxi driver."

Jeff Becker:
I said, "Well, it's connected to my credit card." And he goes, "Well, what's a credit card?"

Support - Nick:
Oh my goodness.

Jeff Becker:
Okay, well then we do this and that. So our kids they're so naïve and so uneducated about the life skills.

Jeff Becker:
I was talking to Dan yesterday off-the-air about we bring in sports psychologists and it's not about basketball to me. I'm almost just cheating the system by reeling these guys in by basketball as the bait and I get to use sports psychologists, nutritionists, and financial literacy, and interview skills.

Jeff Becker:
Because these guys are going to be put in front of a microphone on ESPN one day and I don't want them to look like an idiot.

Support - Nick:
Right, it's so important. I think it was Shaq that said it, "A lot of people can make money, the smart ones hold on to it."

Host - Dan:
Well Shaq also spent his entire rookie season check in one month.

Support - Nick:
Well he learned really quick.

Host - Dan:
Or someone yelled at him.

Jeff Becker:
I heard a stat just yesterday they told me that 85% of NFL players after four years of leaving the NFL will file for bankruptcy.

Support - Nick:
Oh yeah. Because they get used to a lifestyle that they can only afford in the moment and they don't understand that their career is a fifth of their life maybe.

Host - Dan:
Not even.

Support - Nick:
If that. An average career at least in the NFL I believe is three years. Basketball I can't assume it's much longer and it's got to be a lot harder to get into.

Host - Dan:
Yeah, you could be a kicker in the NHL. They don't have that position in basketball.

Jeff Becker:
But it goes back to, we literally are using basketball as a bait to get these kids to become more well-rounded young men.

Jeff Becker:
Not only that, we truly are educating the parents as well as how do you help communicate with them before games during games, after games.

Jeff Becker:
Those types of things are very valuable, not just from my perspective but just from growing and building the father-son relationship as well.

Support - Nick:
100%. You have a culture in place, whether you guys have defined it or not, like literally defined it, you clearly have one.

Support - Nick:
Has anyone ever not fit the bill and no matter what you've tried to do to develop them as a character, they're not responding and you had to kick them out of the program.

Jeff Becker:
Oh, absolutely. We talk about all the time is when I was at the college level, college coaches, they categorize their players as high-maintenance and low-maintenance individuals.

Host - Dan:
Yeah, that's very real.

Jeff Becker:
Literally the high-maintenance individuals it's, "Hey Jeff, you got to go check Mike's class and make sure he's in class." We're not going to put up with that because guess what-

Host - Dan:
Yeah babying.

Jeff Becker:
Yeah. That's not who we are and that's not what we're about.

Jeff Becker:
We've turned away some of the top kids in the state, some of the top kids in the country because we know that their grades aren't good enough or we know that their dad's a headache, that their mom's a headache, that they're high-maintenance individuals.

Support - Nick:
A Lonzo Ball situation.

Jeff Becker:
100%. Man, you guys have no idea. We've put up with that.

Support - Nick:
Hits close to home.

Jeff Becker:
But we've dealt with it all, we've seen it all and at the end of the day, not only does it hurt us as a program, it hurts their teammates, it hurts the chemistry of the players, and their experience.

Jeff Becker:
Yes, it's a business so we don't want anyone to feel slighted because we have one cancer. What I tell my kids is, "Hey, no matter what kind of cancer you are in the body, what does a doctor do? They cut it out."

Jeff Becker:
It's that simple.

Support - Nick:
So what's something that you've learned along the way.

Support - Nick:
I know that you said when you first started you were fed up with coaching college basketball, you did not want to do club because of the stigma it had, so you went in with the intention you're going to do it your way.

Support - Nick:
What's something you learned along that process?

Jeff Becker:
Relationships matter. I would say that.

Jeff Becker:
I would say I just heard a phrase the other day from a podcast, from a very successful person. The first thing they said is, "You're just not that important. Be less, do more."

Jeff Becker:
It's true. Humility goes a very long way. Honesty goes a very long way. Empathy goes a very long way. Being vulnerable and saying "Hey, I don't know but I'll find out. I'll get the answers for you."

Jeff Becker:
I tell my coaches to have PhDs and PhDs mean be poor, be hungry, be driven. Be poor, hungry, and driven. It has nothing to do about Xs and Os.

Jeff Becker:
It has nothing to do about where you played basketball or how many points you scored but it's about making a difference in someone's life every day.

Support - Nick:
That's fantastic, man. You got any words of wisdom or I think you pretty much covered that to wrap this up.

Host - Dan:
I think he had plenty of words of wisdom.

Jeff Becker:
No, I'm actually looking at my office wall right now where I write all my little quotes down. The two things I like to say to my players and my coaches is, "If you're too big for the small things, you're probably too small for the big things."

Support - Nick:
I like that.

Jeff Becker:
Details matter, the little things matter. Make sure I'm not just sitting up here in the office. Make sure I'm going and checking in on the front desk people and know what their dreams are. Make sure I know what they want to do in five years.

Jeff Becker:
Make sure I'm helping them succeed to their dreams just as much as I'm trying to help a junior in high school try to get a Division I scholarship.

Support - Nick:
I think you're very much on the right track without a day of business in your life and this is going to be a growing business for years to come, Jeff.

Jeff Becker:
I appreciate it guys and I could do this literally all day long so anytime you want me on or when you guys come out here to the Scottsdale and Phoenix area, hit me up and I'll be sure to put you through a basketball workout.

Support - Nick:
We will.

Host - Dan:
I'm always down for a workout.

Support - Nick:
Yeah, I might take you up on that. Thank you so much for being on the show, man.

Jeff Becker:
Absolutely guys, appreciate it. Have a good day.

Host - Dan:
You too.

Jeff Becker:
All right. Bye-bye.

Support - Nick:
All right, see you.

Host - Dan:
So, if you liked this episode be sure to go and leave us a review. Your feedback helps us make better episodes every week. If you're a studio fitness owner who wants to streamline processes with a studio management software that's actually affordable, check out fitDEGREE. Go and find us at fitDEGREE.com. That's F-I-T-D-E-G-R-E-E dot com to talk with a team member today. We'll see you back here next week same day, same time for another podcast episode featuring amazing studio fitness owners.

Host - Dan:
See you later everyone.

Nick DennisComment